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Service Tree

The Service Tree lists all services in "branched" groups, starting with the very general and moving to the very specific. Click on the name of any group name to see the sub-groups available within it. Click on a service code to see its details and the providers who offer that service.

Critical Service Status Information

Programs that gather and disseminate to the public, government agencies, the media and other organizations information regarding the status of critical community services following a major disaster or large-scale emergency that disrupts the normal functioning of a community.

Extreme Cold Warming Centers

Programs that provide daytime or evening access to heated facilities during times of extreme cold for people who are temporarily at risk for exposure due to a power failure, fuel shortage, road closure, homelessness or other situations which make them vulnerable.

Extreme Heat Cooling Programs

Programs that provide access to air conditioned facilities, extend the hours during which public swimming pools and local spray grounds are open, activate street shower sites or take other steps to protect the public’s health during dangerously hot weather. Some communities operate hotlines that residents can call if they see people on the street who are in distress due to the heat so that vans can be dispatched to take victims to cooling centers or other places of shelter. At greatest risk during heat emergencies are older adults, young children, individuals with compromised immune systems and people who take certain types of medication. Existing health conditions such as chronic illness, hypertension, circulatory problems, and obesity can also heighten an individual’s vulnerability.

Post Disaster Mental Health Services

Programs that provide a variety of services following a major disaster or large-scale emergency which help individuals cope with their own psychological reactions to the incident and/or prepare them to provide emotional support for family members, friends and neighbors who are feeling frightened, confused and no longer in control of their lives because of the event.

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